Abstract

Case Report

Percutaneous treatment of severe retroperitoneal hematoma after percutaneous coronary intervention

Agarwal Rajendra Kumar* and Agarwal Rajiv

Published: 2021-09-25 12:09:45 | Volume 6 - Issue 3 | Pages: 055-058

We describe a patient who developed severe retroperitoneal and intraperitoneal bleeding complicating femoral arterial catheterization for Percutaneous coronary intervention. Balloon tamponade of the actively bleeding femoral artery was effective in sealing off the leakage.
This management strategy for this problem emphasizing an anatomical based interventional approach if the patient does not stabilize with volume resuscitation.

Read Full Article HTML DOI: 10.29328/journal.jccm.1001119 Cite this Article Read Full Article Pdf

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We describe a patient who developed severe retroperitonea...

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We describe a patient who developed severe retroperitonea...

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